Champion Ranch in Brady
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Aoudad

Native to Africa
Weight: 175-320 pounds
Gestation Period: 6 months
Number of young: One or Two
Maximum Age: 10-15 years
Horns: both male and female

Aoudad are native to North Africa. Their long, thick, curved horns are impressive. Their hair is sandy brown with long beard type hair on the bottom of their necks and on the front of their front legs. The Aoudad stand 30-40 inches at the shoulder and weigh from 175 to 320 pounds. This is a magnificent animal which is usually mounted in a half body to show off its beautiful long flowing chaps down the front legs. Don't let its majestic look fool you; it is one of the most difficult exotic animals to harvest. They are also called Barbary Sheep but are closer related to a goat. The males have a strong scent, make grunting sounds, and have outstanding climbing ability.

Addax

Native to Africa
Weight: 130-260 pounds
Gestation Period: 9 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 20-25 years
Horns: Both male and female (average 30", Trophy 36"+)

Addax have broad, flat hooves with flat soles that help prevent them from sinking into the desert sand. In the winter, the coats are dark grayish-brown, and in the summer they become white. In warm weather, they dig deep depressions in the sand where they rest; their preference is underneath boulders that give shade and protection from the hot desert sun and wind.

Arabian Oryx

Native to the Middle East
Weight: 150 - 200 pounds
Gestation Period: 8½ months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 15-18 years
Horns: both male and female

The Arabian Oryx is a medium-sized Antelope with a distinct shoulder bump, long, straight horns, and a tufted tail. It is the smallest member of the oryx genus, and native to the desert areas of the Arabian Peninsula.

Axis

Native to India
Weight: 150-200 pounds
Gestation Period: 7½ months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 9-13 years
Antlers: Males Only

The Axis deer´s unique bright reddish coat marked with white spots makes it one of the most beautiful of all deer species. A large buck can weigh up to 250 pounds with a beautiful six by six antler configuration that is upwards of 30 inches or more. The antlers are not dropped in a specific season. Instead, the bucks shed their antlers on their birthdays with rut taking place from July to September. This makes the Axis the only deer where both hard-horned and velvet bucks exist at the same time. Cautious-natured Axis deer are elusive and can be a great challenge to even the experienced hunter. Axis meat is delicious.

Blackbuck Antelope

Native to India
Weight: 70-90 pounds
Gestation Period: 5 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 10-15 years
Horns: Males

Blackbuck antelope have a black coat with white under parts. The females and young males are yellowish-brown. The males are born light brown and then grow blacker on their backs as they grow older and in winter. Males stand about 32 inches tall at the shoulders and weigh between 70 and 90 pounds. Female blackbuck antelope are smaller, are beige or light brown, and do not have horns. Blackbuck antelope are some of the fastest animals on earth and can outrun almost any other animal over long distances. They can run almost 50 miles per hour when necessary.

Black Hawaiian

Weight:130-160 pounds Gestation Period: 6 months Number of young: One or Two Maximum Age: 10-15 years

There is some controversy on how the Black Hawaiian breed was started. Some say it is a cross of Mouflon and black hair sheep from the Hawaiian islands. Others say they are Barbados with a dilution of the red color gene making them black. The color of the ram is black with many rams having a little white on the muzzle around the nose and sometimes having an outer coat of reddish wool. The horns are usually dark and grow up, back, down, forward, up, and out. There are fewer Black Hawaiian rams than the other sheep species. They often have a thick, nice beard on their neck.

Blesbok

Native to Africa
Weight: 150-175 pounds
Gestation Period: 8 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 11-13 years
Horns: Both male and female


Blesboks have a prominent white blaze on the face and a horizontal brown strip dividing this blaze above the eyes. The body is colored brown with a lighter colored saddle on the back, and the rump an even lighter shade. The legs are brown with a white patch behind the top part of the front legs, with the lower legs more white. Both sexes carry horns, ringed almost to the tip. Female horns are slightly more slender.

Corsican Ram

Native to West Indies
Weight: 105 - 125 pounds
Gestation Period: 6 months
Number of young: One or Two
Maximum Age: 12 years
Horns: Males


Originally from the West Indies, the Corsican will usually be brown with a light colored belly. Males will often have long black hair on the neck that many call a ruff. The horn configuration on a ram can vary from a tight curl similar to a Mouflon sheep or a wide and flaring horn configuration. Horn lengths on a trophy-sized animal start at about 30 inches, and exceptional specimens can grow horns that measure up to the 40 inch mark.

Dama Gazelle

Native to Africa
Weight: 77-165 pounds
Gestation Period: 6½ months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 12-18 years
Antlers/Horns: Both male and female up to 14"

The largest of all gazelle species, the Dama has a small white patch on the throat, and a white face, with red cheek patches and thin black stripes running from the eyes to the corners of the mouth. All Dama gazelles have thin legs and a long, slender neck, as well as long, S-shaped horns, which are larger and thicker in males.

Dybowski Sika

Native to China, Japan, and East Europe
Weight: 150 - 240 pounds
Gestation Period: 7½ months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 18-25 years
Antlers: Males

Sika exist in a number of color variations, from rust colored to lighter color patterns often showing rows of pale, white spots, while darker Sika may have a group of faint, discolored spots. The underside and belly are often lightly colored. Males and females grow neck ruff in winter months. Sika have a distinctive rump patch with a bright white underside which fluffs when alarmed. They have barrel-shaped torsos with dainty legs. Short snouts give a wedge-like appearance to face and head. Males grow antlers that extend upward and branch out.

Eld's Deer

Native to Asia
Weight: 275 - 380 pounds
Gestation Period: 8 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 10 years
Antlers: Males

The Eld´s Deer is a medium sized deer. They have a graceful design, with a slender body and thin, yet powerful legs.
They feature a brownish red color to their fur in the summer months and more of a dusty gray in the winter time. The males also tend to have darker coloring than the females. The Eld's Deer is a very rare species.

Elk

Native to North America Weight: up to 1100 pounds Gestation Period: 8½ months Number of young: One or Two Maximum Age: 10-15 years Antlers: Males only; shed each year

Elk can be distinguished by their large size, brown or tan bodies, yellowish-brown tail, and rump patch. They have thick necks and slender legs and can stand as tall as 5 feet at the shoulder. Their long legs enable them to run as fast as 35 miles per hour. Males weigh from 600 to 1,100 pounds and have six-tined antlers that can grow up to 5 feet long. Antlers begin growing in early spring and fall off in winter. The females are smaller, about 400 to 500 pounds, and lack antlers. Mating season is in September and October. The location of the Elks’ eyes on their head allows them to see almost directly behind them. However, they have little depth perception, only in a small area in front of their nose. In addition to eating leaves and bark from trees, elk use seedlings to mark their territory. Males strip off bark with their antlers, and females pull off bark with their teeth. Then both males and females rub the seedlings with chins and muzzles to cover the plants with their scent. Elk can live in many different environments.

Eland

South, East, and Central Africa
Weight: 700 - 2,100 pounds
Gestation Period: 9 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 15-20 years
Antlers: Males and females

The eland is one of the largest antelopes in existence. Its coat is tan, fawn or tawny colored, turning slightly bluish-grey on the neck and shoulders with age, and a short dark mane runs down the back of the neck. Both male and female common eland possess horns that rise with a slight twist, back from the head to sharp points. The horns of the male are more robust and bear more distinct ridges than those of the female. The massive adult males can also be recognized by the large fold of loose skin that hangs below the throat (the dewlap), and the patch of long, coarse, dark hair on the forehead. These features become respectively larger and bushier with age. The common eland has a fairly small and pointed mouth and muzzle, small, narrow ears, and a long tail with a tuft of black hair at the tip. A distinct clicking sound can be heard as the common eland roams around its habitat; this unusual and distinctive feature is believed to be the result of two halves of the hoof knocking together when the foot is raised, or by the movement of bones in the leg.

Fallow Deer

Native to Europe
Weight: 140 - 275 pounds
Gestation Period: 9 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 10 - 12 years
Antlers: Males only

Prized as an ornamental species for many years, the fallow deer are seen in three different color phases; white, spotted, and chocolate. The coat becomes darker and thicker in winter, and the white spots can become more faint. Their palmated antlers with numerous points make fallow magnificent and popular trophy.

Gemsbok

Native to Southwest Africa
Weight: 400 - 600 pounds
Gestation Period: 9 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 20 years
Horns: Both Male and Female

The Gemsbok is a very striking animal with dramatic features and long spear like horns. It has a thick horse-like neck with a short mane that runs from the head to the shoulders and a compact, muscular body. The distinctive black and white face markings are said to have contributed to their name Gemsbok, given to them by the Boers, which means chamois. There is white around the nose and mouth, black on top of the muzzle, which joins a black band that runs from in front of the ear through the eyes and to the middle of the lower jaw. The ears end in a black tip, and there is a narrow black stripe down the spine, a black patch on top of the rump, and a black tail. There is also a black band that separates their gray-fawn colored flanks and the white under parts. All four legs are black on their top half, with white below the knees and black patches on the shins. Males and females are difficult to tell apart. Their horns are long and extend straight back from the head and diverge rather widely at the tips. Female horns tend to be more slender and slightly longer than males and are sometimes curved and more parallel. The tips are pointed and sharp, and native Africans used the tips for spear points. The horns are ringed but are smooth near the tips. The horns of the calves grow extremely fast, and when they emerge from concealment after birth, their horns are very evident. This has lead to the myth that a Gemsbok is born with horns.

Giraffe

Native to Africa
Weight: 2400-3000 pounds
Gestation Period: 15 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 20-25 years
Horns: Both male and female

Giraffes are one of the world's tallest mammals. They are well known for their long necks, long legs, and spotted patterns. Giraffes have small "horns" or knobs on top of their heads that grow to be about five inches long. These knobs are used to protect the head in fights. Giraffes are non-territorial, social animals. They travel in large herds that are not organized in any way. Herds may consist of any combination of sexes or ages.

Jacob's 4 Horn

Native to the Middle East
Weight: 80 - 120 pounds
Gestation Period: 5 months
Number of young: One to Three, often twins
Maximum Age: Up to 15 years
Horns: Both male and female

The Jacob´s Four Horned sheep is one of the oldest breeds of sheep and has been traced back to the Mediterranean area thousands of years ago. Although the exact country of origin is unknown, it is actually referenced in the Bible. Jacobs are long, wooly-bodied sheep with a triangular head and sloping rump. Both male and females are horned with the male horns being much larger. Their horns can grow in such unusual shapes and sizes that no two Jacobs ram horns are exactly alike, making for excellent one-of-a-kind trophies.

Kudu

Native to Africa
Weight: 540 - 650 pounds
Gestation Period: 9 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 10-20 years
Horns: Males

The largest-horned antelope having a grayish or brownish coat with white vertical stripes, and a short busy tail. Greater Kudus have a narrow body with long legs, they possess between 4 - 12 vertical white stripes along their torso. The head tends to be darker in colour than the rest of the body, and exhibits a small white chevron which runs between the eyes. The males also have large manes running along their throats, and large horns with two and a half twists.

Mouflon

Native to West Asia, Europe, and Greece
Weight: 125 pounds
Gestation Period: 5 months
Number of young: One to three
Maximum Age: 15-20 years
Horns: Both male and female

The Mouflon sheep came from the islands of Sardinia, Corsica, and Cyprus and is thought to be one of the two ancestors for all modern domestic sheep breeds. Mouflon are a reddish brown color, marked with a dark stripe down the neck and shoulders. The Mouflon stands about 27 inches tall at the shoulders and develops a woolly undercoat in the winter. The horns of a Mouflon ram are heart-shaped with trophy quality rams having horns of 30 inches or more. It's also distinguished by the saddle-looking white spot on its back. The sheep usually live in groups of 20-30 and use the curved horns to protect themselves. A mountain sheep and a grazer, the animal warns other sheep by baaing in different tones.

Nile Lechwe

Native to Central Africa
Weight: 200-270 pounds
Gestation Period: 8 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 20 years
Horns: Male

The Nile Lechwe has a very shaggy coat. The hair on the cheeks is particularly long in both sexes, and males may have even longer hair on their necks. Males and females have strikingly different coloration: females and juveniles are golden brown, while males become a rich mahogany or brownish-black as they age. Mature males have a white "saddle" on the shoulders and white markings on their otherwise dark faces; females do not have these strong markings, and in immature males, they remain golden brown. Only males grow horns, which rise from the head and bend backwards before curving upwards at the tips. The horns are strongly ridged at their bases.

Nilgai

Native to India and South Asia
Weight: Males up to 650 pounds, Females up to 400 pounds
Gestation Period: 8 months
Number of young: Twin births 60% of the time
Maximum Age: 10-12 years in the wild
Horns: Males

The Nilgai is a large antelope that more resembles a horse than a bull in stature and body structure. Four to five feet tall at the shoulder, the Nilgai's shoulders are set higher than his hindquarters giving a long, slanting appearance. Born brown, male coat color changes to blue-gray or charcoal as animal matures but the females remain brown. The narrow rump patch and throat bib are white, as well as 2 patches above each ankle and 2 small spots on check and jawline. Males grow sharp, devil-like horns that grow up and curve slightly forward. Average horn length is 6 to 10". Horn bases become more triangular with age. Bulls have a unique "beard" of hair that hangs from their neck that seems to resemble that found on a male turkey. Nilgai meat is some of the tastiest in the world.

Nubian Ibex

Native to the Middle East
Weight: 50-150 pounds
Gestation Period: 5 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: Up to 17 years
Horns: Both male and female

The Nubian Ibex is relatively small compared to other Ibexes. Its coat is a light sandy brown in color with lighter hindquarters. The under parts are almost white, and the upper side of the tail is darker. Males have a dark stripe on their front legs and one down their back, as well as a dark beard. During the October rut, the neck, chest, shoulders, upper legs, and sides of bucks become dark brown to almost black in color. The semicircular horns curve upward, backwards, and finally down. While they are found in both sexes, horns are much larger in males than females.

Nyala

Native to South Africa
Weight: 120-310 pounds
Gestation Period: 7 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: up to 16 years
Horns: Both male and female

The Nyala is an elegant and rather attractively marked antelope, with a grayish to chestnut-brown coat, a white chevron between the eyes, two white spots on the cheeks, two white patches on the throat and chest, white spots on the flanks and rump, and up to nine poorly defined white stripes on the sides The under parts are slightly paler, and the dark legs bear white patches on the insides, while the tail is rather bushy, with a white underside. The pattern of markings may be unique to the individual. The coat of the Nyala is smooth and glossy during the summer, becoming shaggier during winter months.

Ostrich

Native to East Africa
Weight: 150 - 320 pounds
Gestation Period: 30-45 days
Maximum Age: 40 years

Ostriches are large, flightless birds that have long legs and a long neck that protrudes from a round body. Males have bold black-and-white coloring that they use to attract females. Females, on the other hand, are light brown. Ostriches are bigger than any other bird in the world. They can grow up to 9 feet tall and can weigh up to 320 lbs. An ostrich's eyes are 2 inches in diameter, the largest of any land animal. The ostrich can run as fast as 43 mph, the fastest of any bird.

Painted Desert Sheep

Orginated in North America
Weight: 80 - 120 pounds
Gestation Period: 6 months
Number of young: One or Two
Maximum Age: 12 years
Antlers: both male and female, although male horns are larger

The most recent addition to the Trophy Corsican Sheep scene is the Painted Desert sheep. These are Corsican sheep that are bi-, tri- and even quad-colored. Many consider this ram the most beautifully colored of all the exotic sheep. The Painted Desert Sheep is known primarily for the ram's ability to grow a trophy class set of horns. The rams will grow a luxuriant mane often beginning at the shoulders with a thick bib at the front of the neck.

Pere David's Deer

Native to China
Weight: 300-500 pounds
Gestation Period: 9 months
Number of young: One or Two
Maximum Age: 20 years
Antlers: Males only

The Pere David's Deer, or Milou, as a species is totally extinct in the Chinese wild. A French missionary named Father Armand David first discovered these deer in the Chinese Emperor's hunting park south of Peking in 1865. He sent specimens to Europe the following year, and a breeding herd was later set up by the Duke of Bedford at Woburn Abbey. The entire Chinese herd was destroyed during the revolution in 1900, but the herd in England was successful and increased in size. Eventually their descendants found their way into parks and zoos. Some of the offspring found themselves on ranches in this country. This seeding of animals has grown into herds large enough to sustain a huntable population. The Pere David has a longish tail and stands about 45 inches at the shoulder. Their color is a reddish gray with a white underside and a white ring around the eyes. The antler configuration is different in the Pere David than in most deer. Their antlers have forked brow tines and long slender back horns sometimes with many points off them. They are the only deer to grow antler tines backwards. Many say these animals have the body of a donkey, head of a horse, hooves of a cow, neck of a camel, and antlers of a deer.

Red Lechwe

Native to South Central Africa
Weight: 150-260 pounds
Gestation Period: 7-8 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 15 years
Horns: Males only

The Lechwe, or Red Lechwe, is a fleet-footed water-lover, skimming across wetlands and swamps with the ease and grace of a gazelle, although it is a bit clumsy and uncertain on hard ground. Well adapted to wet conditions, its long hooves splay widely over soft ground, making it sure footed and speedy over mud, water and reeds. This robust, long-haired antelope is a strong swimmer, and will dive into water without hesitation if pursued. The lechwe comes on to dry land only to rest and calve. Lechwe are medium-sized antelope, with coats of long, rough hair. The hindquarters are higher than the forequarters, and black encircles the legs between the hooves and the false hooves. They have a white patch around the eyes. They eat a variety of grasses, sedges, shrubs and semi-aquatic plants, selecting for new growth.

Red Sheep

Native to Asia
Weight: 110 - 150 pounds
Gestation Period: 7-8 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 12 years
Horns: Males and some females

Male Red Sheep have large sickle-shaped horns, which are prized by many a trophy hunter. For most subspecies, females also have horns, but they are much smaller than the horns of the males. In a few populations, most or all females do not grow horns. The different subspecies vary slightly in overall appearance; color also varies with season and between males and females. The face is generally grayish with a white muzzle, nostrils and inside of the ears. The legs are long and slender with a vertical black line below the knees. Red Sheep have a white belly and a coat that varies in color from gray with a reddish tinge to brown and coffee colored. The adult rams tend to develop a substantial chest ruff of long, coarse hair in the throat region. In most of the Red Sheep subspecies the males also have a lighter colored saddle patch, which develops and increases in size as they get older and a black stripe, which begins midway along the nape of the neck and along the shoulders before continuing under the body, ending behind the back legs. Red sheep have large glands beneath the eye, which often exudes a sticky substance that mats the hair

Roan

Native to West, Central, East and South Africa
Weight: 570-615 pounds
Gestation Period: 9 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: up to 17 years
Horns: Both male and female

The upper body of the Roan Antelope is grizzled grey to roan in color with the legs darker. The underparts are white. On the face there is a black/brown and white facial mask, slightly lighter in females, that consists of a white spot on either side of the eye and a white muzzle. On the neck and withers is an erect, dark-tipped mane, while a light 'beard' is present on the throat. A long tuft of dark hair is present on the tips of the ears. The arched, ringed horns are found in both sexes, though slightly smaller in females, grow 2-3.5 feet long.

Sable

Native to South Africa, Zambia, and Kenya
Weight: 400-500 pounds
Gestation Period: 9 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: up to 17 years
Horns: Both male and female

The Sable is a rotund, barrel-chested antelope with a short neck and a long face. It resembles the larger Roan antelope, to which it is closely related. Among its distinctive features are its long horns which rise vertically, then sweep backwards in a pronounced curve. They are found in both sexes, but the male's horns are slightly larger and heavier than the female's. Both males and females have manes on the neck, and when they arch their necks and stand with their head held high and tails outstretched, they resemble horses. This flexed-neck position makes sables appear larger than they really are. The males maintain this position even when they gallop, as the arched neck is an important manifestation of dominance.

Sitatunga

Native to West and Central Africa
Weight: 100-240 pounds
Gestation Period: 7-8 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: Up to 19 years
Antlers/Horns: Males have long, twisting horns

The Sitatunga is an amphibious antelope, which means it is comfortable in the water as well as on land. It has a long, shaggy, oily coat. Males are grayish-brown, while females are reddish-chocolate brown. They have six to eight vertical white stripes each side of their body and splayed hooves. Their hooves make them clumsy and vulnerable on firm terrain, but allow them to walk more easily through muddy, vegetated swamplands.

Springbok

Native to South Africa
Weight: 66-105 pounds
Gestation Period: 5-6 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 7-9 years
Antlers/Horns: Both male and female as long as 19"

Springbok are reddish brown in color with a pale underside. On each of their flanks they have a dark brown stripe that separates their brown upper parts from their underside. Their head is white and they have a dark brown stripe that runs from each eye down to their upper lip.
They have a pocket-like skin flap that runs from the middle of their back to their tail. When they are excited or frightened they can lift this flap, which makes the white hairs underneath stand up in a conspicuous crest that acts as a warning to other Springbok.
Springbok are known to leap up to 13 feet in the air in an activity known as pronking. While in the air their body is curved, and their legs are stiff, close together and point downwards. Upon landing they immediately leap upwards again and during this period the crest on their back is raised. It is unknown why they pronk but it is possible they do it to indicate to predators that they have been spotted.
When required Springbok can reach speeds up to 60 mph - they are among the top ten fastest land animals in the world.

Texas Dall

Hybrid native to Texas Weight: 75-160 pounds Gestation Period: 6 months Number of young: One or Two Maximum Age: 10-15 years Antlers: Both sexes (males up to 40")

The Texas Dall Ram looks similar to the wild Alaskan Dall Ram, although the color of the Texas Dall can range from a milky white to a dull creamy white or peach color. A hybrid sheep that originated in Texas, it is believed to be a cross between an Alaskan Dall and a Mouflon and this striking sheep is usually completely white. Their huge horns grow up, out, down, forward, up, and out. This beautiful ram is one of the most popular hunting trophies of all the exotic sheep.

Thomson´s Gazelle

Native to East Africa (Kenya and Tanzania)
Weight: 33 - 75 pounds
Gestation Period: 6 months
Number of young: 1-2
Maximum Age: 10-15 years
Antlers/Horns: Both male and female as long as 17"

Despite its limited distribution this is by far Africa´s most abundant gazelle . The
´Tommy´, as it is locally known, has a distinct black band running along the side of the body that divides the yellowish-fawn to reddish-fawn upperparts from the clean white underparts. The white buttocks are edged with black, extending to the short, black tail which is constantly flicking. Both sexes of the Thomson´s Gazelle have long, strongly ringed horns that grow fairly close together, although those of the ewe are generally shorter, thinner, and frequently deformed. The face is boldly marked with white, fawn, dark brown and black, and varies between individuals.

Waterbuck

Native to West, Central and East Africa
Weight: 350 - 600 pounds
Gestation Period: 8½ months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: Up to 18 years
Horns: Males only

This rather shaggy-haired antelope is noted for its association with water and its strong musky scent. Its coat of coarse hair ranges in color from grey-brown to reddish, with darker legs. The face is marked with white around the nose, mouth, above the eyes and on the throat. The short, rounded ears are white on the inside and black on the edges and tips. The males bear long, heavily ridged horns, extending back from the head and then sweeping forward.

White-bearded Wildebeest

Native to Northern Tanzania and Kenya
Weight: 325 - 600 pounds
Gestation Period: 8½ months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: 20 years
Horns: Males and females

There is no other antelope like the wildebeest. It looks like it was assembled from spare parts – the forequarters could have come from an ox, the hindquarters from an antelope, and the mane and tail from a horse. The antics of the territorial bulls during breeding season have earned them the name "clowns of the savanna".
The species that forms the large herds of the Serengetis-Mara ecosystem of Tanzania and Kenya is variously known as the brindled, blue- or white-bearded gnu. Scientists do, however, make a distinction and list the blue as a separate race restricted to southern Tanzania. The wildebeest described here is the white-bearded of southern Kenya and northern Tanzania.
The head of the wildebeest is large and box-like. Both males and females have curving horns, that are close together at the base, but curve outward, inward and slightly backward. The body looks disproportionate, as the front end is heavily built, the hindquarters slender and the legs spindly.
The wildebeest is gray with darker vertical stripes that look almost black from a distance. This species has a dark mane and a long tail. Newborns are a yellowish-brown, but change to adult color at about 2 months.

Whitetail

Native to North, Central, and South America
Weight: 100-300 pounds
Gestation Period: 6½ months
Number of young: One or Two, Triplets are uncommon
Maximum Age: 8-12 years
Antlers: Males only

The most abundant big game animal in North America, the whitetail deer is named for its signature tail and white underparts. According to scientists, there are actually 38 sub-species of whitetail deer. A favorite with hunters for the trophy racks, whitetail can be elusive, running up to 40 miles per hour and able to clear an 8 foot hurdle. Whitetail antler growth is usually complete by the end of August, and the speed at which their antlers grow makes them the fastest growing structures in the animal kingdom. A whitetail buck sheds his antlers every year, usually between late December and February. The members of the deer family are ruminants, having a four-compartmented stomach, which allows the deer to feed very rapidly. Not having a gall bladder allows them to eat vegetation that would kill domestic animals.

Zebra

Native to Africa
Weight: 390-850 pounds
Gestation Period: 12 months
Number of young: One
Maximum Age: up to 40 years
Antlers/Horns: none

No animal has a more distinctive coat than the zebra. Each animal´s stripes are as unique as fingerprints. No two are exactly alike, although each of the three species (Grant's, Grevy's, and Hartman's) has its own general pattern. Zebras have shiny coats that dissipate over 70 percent of incoming heat, and some scientists believe the stripes help the animals withstand intense solar radiation. The black and white stripes are a form of camouflage called disruptive coloration that breaks up the outline of the body. Although the pattern is visible during daytime, at dawn or in the evening when their predators are most active, zebras look indistinct and may confuse predators by distorting true distance.

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